Stadium Park and Chevron Parklands

Jumping. Climbing. Building. Tunnelling. Chevron Parkland, within Stadium Park at Optus Stadium in Perth, Western Australia, is designed to ignite the imagination and connect kids with nature and indigenous culture. 

We rehabilitated the former sewage treatment plant and rubbish tip beside the Swan River, transforming it into a place of discovery for kids and families to enjoy 365 days of play’. 

The site is an important place for the local Whadjuk people, so we worked closely with Whadjuk community members to best represent their culture and depict their connection to country. 

The six Whadjuk seasons are reflected throughout the six zones of Chevron Parklands through plants, materials, play themes and signs. For example, the Birak first summer’ zone teaches kids about finding places to beat the heat, like the cooling numbat burrows’ and tunnels. Stadium Park’s arbour tells the Aboriginal Creation Story, and most of the precinct’s public art is by indigenous artists.

We rehabilitated the entire site – improving soil and water quality and flood resilience – and introduced thousands of indigenous plants to the park, lake and river edges to create a habitat for native birds, fish and insects. And we transformed the area’s once-desolate spaces into a series of scenic promenades, cycle paths, and flexible event and play spaces – all punctuated by landmark public artworks.

Now, what was once a wasteland is a rich landscape for celebrating Perth’s heritage, land and people – proof that even the most unloved urban places have huge potential.

Client

Western Australian Government

Location

Perth, Australia

Status

Completed

Year

2017

Scale

41ha (whole precinct) / 2.6ha (Chevron Parkland)

Collaborators

Multiplex (main contractor), Whadjuk Working Party (Indigenous consultation group), Aurora Environmental (environmental consultant)

Design team

Anthony Brookfield, Hannah Galloway, Nicholas Pearson, Aysen Jenkins, Sarah Gaikhorst, Hannah Pannell, Doug Pott, Jill Turpin, Lucy Wilson, Asile Wong

Imagery

Peter Bennetts, Robert Frith/​Acorn Photo

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The stadium and surrounding Stadium Park will be a place where all members of our community can come together and enjoy, and it also provides opportunities for Western Australians to learn about Whadjuk and Noongar culture.”

Ben Wyatt Aboriginal Affairs Minister, Western Australia
  • Nature play zones, lawns and landmark public artworks
  • A sensory play area with musical instruments, trampolines and climbing ropes 
  • A sports oval for public use on non-game days
  • A community arbour that links the Hassell-designed Stadium Station to the river, amphitheatre, boardwalk, and play and picnic areas
  • 2019 International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA) - Award for Excellence - Open Space
  • 2018 Australian Institute of Landscape Architects National Awards - Award of Excellence for Urban Design
  • 2018 Australian Institute of Landscape Architects National Awards - Award of Excellence for Play Spaces
  • 2018 Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (Western Australia) Awards – WA Medal
  • 2018 Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (WA) Awards – Award of Excellence for Play Spaces
  • 2018 Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (WA) Awards – Award of Excellence for Parks and Open Spaces
  • 2018 Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (WA) Awards – Landscape Architecture Award for Urban Design

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