News / April 2019
Tuesday 30 April 2019
Four HASSELL projects shortlisted in the INDE.Awards 2019

The INDE.Awards shortlist for 2019 has been announced with four HASSELL projects being recognised across two categories. Arup Sydney, Arup Melbourne, and The Australian Ballet have all been shortlisted in The Work Space category, with SylecraftHOME in Melbourne being shortlisted in The Shopping Space category.

Rob Backhouse, HASSELL, said that the INDE.Awards shortlisting is another recognition of our commitment to designing places people love.

“It’s testament to our design teams when projects are shortlisted, especially being recognised by the INDE.Awards panel for producing work that stands out along with our peers and their projects. We’d like to wish everyone the best of luck.” Rob said.

The INDE.Awards are run by Indesign Media and winners will be announced on Friday 21 June 2019. Read more about the awards here.

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Monday 29 April 2019
HASSELL designs new arts and cultural precinct set in remote Northern Territory

HASSELL and Architects Without Frontiers are working together with the Bawinanga Aboriginal Corporation and Maningrida Arts and Culture on a proposed new precinct in the community of Maningrida, known as Manayingkarírra by the Kunibidji people, the traditional owners of the land in which the proposal sits.

This project will relocate the separate Djómi Museum and Bábbarra Women’s Centre within a new, integrated Maningrida Arts and Culture Precinct dedicated to revealing the history, cultural practices and contemporary art movement of Maningrida and surrounding regions.

Located in far north Australia, Maningrida has an immediate population of 2300 but also services 32 outstations and homelands in the region. With a dozen different language groups, the community is also one of the most multi-lingual communities (per capita) in the world.

HASSELL Principal and Board Member Mark Loughnan says conversations and consultation with the local people are pivotal to the success of the design process – and to reflecting the powerful connection between place, cultural practice and art making.

“A custom-made facility for the community is crucial to supporting and harnessing the creative, cultural practices within this region,” Mark adds. “The precinct not only provides a local service to the people of Maningrida and its outstations – it can also create sensitive and sustainable connections to the world beyond.”

“With intensive consultation, we can establish a place that truly engages with the community, develops ongoing local legacy and training programs, and also supports a form of social enterprise through the build and the creation of artwork, workshop spaces and education spaces,” Mark says.

The HASSELL design for the precinct is in collaboration with senior artists and cultural leaders of the region to ensure the design responds physically, culturally and socially to their context and feels inherently of its place. The design features two new integrated buildings, each with a different personality and approach to meet its function and fulfil the needs of users.

The New Bábbarra Women’s Centre is more internal, private, local and connected, while the New Djómi Museum is more public and outward reaching. Even though the buildings will use similar materials, construction and systems, they will still feel distinct in terms of how people experience and use them.

The shape and orientation of each building reflects the needs of both visitors and operators. Because it contains the main public entry, the museum will feature an engaging central space surrounded by a series of ‘gallery boxes’ separated by outward views to nature and the adjacent airport. As a counter point, the women’s centre will be more focused on Maningrida and the local community.

The design relies on the landscape to frame and shape access points to the buildings, creating private access for the women’s centre while still offering a welcoming public entry to the museum. HASSELL has also reconfigured the arts centre entrance to align it with the museum and form a single orientation point for all three facilities in the precinct.

John Mawurndjul OAM says young Aboriginal people have grown up with another culture now (non-Aboriginal culture) and are making their own new history, but they are taking the old stories with them.

“This project is story Ngarduk - my story. I looked at those buildings, the [old] museum and Babbarra designs, and I saw the walls cracked, the roof leaking and I decided we needed to move those important places. We need all the arts and culture areas together konda (here at the art centre site) to make one arts and culture area. All the young people will learn about kunborrk (song, dance) and all the cultures from here,” John said.

“At this place, they will see their family history, all the bim (art), the wubbunj (canoes), photos and films. I have travelled all around the world with my exhibitions and people all around the world want to come and learn more about our art. We should have buildings that are kamak rowk (really great) in keeping with our art, culture and designs,” he said.

The proposal seeks to prioritise local employment, education and Indigenous Business Enterprise opportunities throughout the design, construction and life of the precinct. This is proposed through a range of measures including commissioning bespoke artwork to be integrated within the design and developing an indigenous participation strategy to maximise use of locally made materials and workforce.

“A key goal of the project is to collaborate with local partners on design solutions that address long-term community needs and also improve the social and economic capacity of local organisations and workforce,” Mark says.

The concept design for the Maningrida Arts and Culture precinct has been facilitated through the partnership of Architects Without Frontiers together with HASSELL and the network partnership members comprising Tract, Hayball, Bonacci, LCI, Grocon, and WT Partnership.

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Friday 26 April 2019
HASSELL announced as finalist for Croydon Fair Field public square project

HASSELL in collaboration with London based architects We Made That, have been selected amongst six other architectural teams to progress to the second stage of the tender process to design a prominent public space in Croydon’s town centre.

A total of 20 multidisciplinary teams had applied to create a world-class public space within London’s Fair Field. The London Borough of Croydon is encouraging collaboration between specialists that will push the boundaries in terms of public space, art, light, technology, inclusiveness, and favoured bold and innovative proposals.

The HASSELL and We Made That team includes leading planting designer, Professor Nigel Dunnett from the University of Sheffield along with engineers Buro Happold, lighting designers Studio Dekka and art curators Turf Studios.

The project, scheduled to complete in 2022, aims to provide step-free access between Fair Field and nearby George Street, Barclay Road, East Croydon station and Park Lane while delivering a new space for community activity and celebrating the area’s heritage.

HASSELL Principal Jon Hazelwood says that this is a great opportunity to reinvigorate the Fair Field area and ensure everyone can access a space that has such a deep connection to the community.

“During Croydon’s reconstruction in the mid-20th Century, Fair Field was transformed into a civic plaza. The space has the potential to be one of London’s most exciting public spaces and we hope to bring that to life, congratulations to all finalists.” Jon said.

All six finalists will have until late May to submit their concepts.

Photography by Jakob Spriestersbach, HASSELL, and We Made That.

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Tuesday 23 April 2019
HASSELL+ receives additional funding for Resilient South City

The Metropolitan Transportation Commission of San Francisco has awarded additional funding to the HASSELL+ Resilient South City project as part of its SB1 grant program.

SB1 – the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017 – provides funding for climate adaptation related to transportation systems in the nine-county Bay Area. Funding is also allocated to mobility and transit improvements around the bay, expanding bicycle and pedestrian access, reducing congestion, and improving freight movement along trade corridors.

Additional funding has also been received from the Bay Area Regional Collaborative, a consortium of four member agencies that works to collaborate and problem-solve for 21st century challenges that affect the Bay Area, including climate change and social and economic injustice.

As part of the Resilient by Design Bay Area Challenge, Resilient South City aims to create more public green space and continuous public access along South San Francisco’s Colma Creek. The goal is to reduce the impacts of flooding, mitigate against sea-level rise vulnerability, restore native flora and fauna, and create more amenity and healthy lifestyle opportunities by connecting a continuous public corridor from Orange Memorial Park to a new public park at the shoreline.

The funding received will focus on developing creek flow and traffic modelling for several adaptation scenarios along Colma Creek. The primary objective is to reduce flood risk (with particular consideration for sea-level rise up the creek), improve access to/along the creek to transit and the Bay, and restore ecologies and increase public amenity along Colma Creek.

HASSELL Principal Richard Mullane said that this additional funding would help develop ideas explored in earlier stages of the project further.

“Earlier stages of the Resilient by Design project allowed the HASSELL+ team to take a holistic approach to the challenges facing South San Francisco. This additional funding will allow us to focus on some key issues facing Colma Creek, transforming it into a biking connection and green corridor rather than a flooding risk,” Richard said.

The announcement of this funding coincides with the release of ‘Resilient by Design – The Book’. This book details the nine visions for a more resilient San Francisco Bay Area that are beginning to take shape, including Resilient South City by HASSELL+, as well as how the Resilient by Design Bay Area Challenge has evolved since its launch in 2017. This is the first time that this visionary work has been compiled together into a single volume.

More information on Resilient South City can be found here. Resilient by Design – The Book can be downloaded here.

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Tuesday 16 April 2019
Dialogues and junior designers at SDW 2019

From hosting meaningful conversations about the future of design to dreaming what that future looks like with the next generation of designers, HASSELL was a key player during the 2019 Singapore Design Week.

Singapore’s architects, designers and design enthusiasts gathered in the HASSELL studio in March for two lively and relevant industry discussions around the topics of WORK/LEARN and Design Leadership.

WORK/LEARN explored the future of learning and working, and the importance of designing for a community-centric culture with panellists Gulcin Cribb (Singapore Management University), Ong Ker Shing (Lekker Architects), Tamagin Blake-Smith and Pamela Jouwena (HASSELL). The discussion was moderated by Narelle Yabuka (Indesign Media Asia).

HASSELL Associate Razvan Ghilic-Micu led the Design Leadership discussion, joined by Kelley Cheng (The Press Room), Randy Chan (Zarch Collaboratives), Ho Weng Hin (Studio Lapis), Tan Szue Hann (MiniWiz) and Fiona Nixon (HASSELL).

“At HASSELL, we strongly believe in the cultural importance of getting together with fellow designers to openly debate topics of importance and relevance to the work we do, to our audience and our clients. Each conversation is a source of knowledge as it brings together different perspectives, and cultivates a joint sense of mission we have as creatives,” said Razvan.

For HASSELL Junior we invited children and their families to join our team of architects, interior designers and urban specialists to dream up an amazing future together in the form of a Tube City. We playfully explored the world of design together with ‘tools of the design trade’ and a generous donation of materials from Interface. The event was crowded, loud and the outcome was an impressive city on the floor of our studio.

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Friday 12 April 2019
State Library of NSW restored as cultural destination

The HASSELL upgrade of the Mitchell Building is stage one of a larger masterplan covering 34,000 square meters of the State Library of NSW. The redesign focused on returning a third of the heritage building back to the people of New South Wales, upgrading and realising its full potential now and into the future.

Previously closed off, underutilised and ad-hoc spaces were carefully stripped back, opened up and converted to functional exhibition spaces which are now accessible, modern and relevant as a cultural destination – all while honouring its historical and culturally significant purpose.

Through our design, we have restored the Mitchell Building as a social asset for people to engage with, revitalising an icon of Sydney’s CBD. Our design maximises every opportunity for visitors to enjoy the Library’s rare and priceless collection and ensures its future inherent value as a public asset.

HASSELL Principal, Liz Westgarth, said that refurbishing the Mitchell Building required a significant understanding and commitment to both the history and future of the Library.

“The State Library of New South Wales has been a landmark in the CBD since the early 1900s and a destination for generations of Australians living in the greater Sydney area. Our design safeguards the Library’s past, present and future relevance within the community, and provides a platform for the Library to give the public greater access to its rich collection of historical artefacts” Liz said.

Photography by Nicole England

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Thursday 11 April 2019
HASSELL and Artemide collaborate to shine a light on workplace wellbeing

Italian manufacturer Artemide has invited HASSELL to design a lighting solution which provides control over immediate working environment and aims to improve workplace wellbeing.

The new relationship between HASSELL and Artemide, globally recognised for their innovative lighting solutions, stems from a shared belief that the wellbeing of the user should be at the heart of the design process.

The new lighting solution, named ALE_01 (Adaptive Lighting Experience), evolved from a need to personalise lighting within a collaborative environment. ALE_01 provides a fluid transition from diffused lighting for social situations to a focused task light whilst reading or doing computer work, without the need for multiple lighting setups or manual adjustments.

The idea has been explored at the 2019 Salone del Mobile in Milan, where HASSELL Associate Federico Vernier discussed the potential for the concept to promote adaptive lighting in the workplace.

“As designers, we could be designing a single product or large-scale workplace project, but the experience of the user of that space or product will always drive the process and the end result. ALE_01 will help address observations we have made within workplace design and we’re excited to develop and share that idea,” Federico said.

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Thursday 11 April 2019
Three HASSELL projects shortlisted for World Landscape Architecture Awards

Three HASSELL projects have been shortlisted in World Landscape Architecture’s 2019 WLA Awards. Two projects have made the Large Built category including Darling Harbour Public Realm and Stadium Park and Chevron Parkland, with Resilient South City making the Conceptual category.

The remaking of Darling Harbour, one of Australia’s most visited public places and a critical location of central Sydney, has changed the heart of the city. The revitalised public realm better connects the city, improving walkability; and with 30% more public space, offers engaging new places for the enjoyment of locals and visitors alike.

The 41-hectare Stadium Park in Perth, Western Australia, provides an active waterside environment for the city’s new world-class sports and entertainment venue. Within the rehabilitated precinct, Chevron Parkland is designed to ignite the imagination, connect kids with indigenous culture and instil a love of nature.

As part of the Resilient by Design Bay Area Challenge, a brief was put forward to design inventive, community-based solutions to sea-level rise, severe storms, flooding and earthquakes. Through extensive research and community engagement, the HASSELL+ proposal for South San Francisco mapped out ways to restore public access to the water and establish more parks and open green spaces to better manage climate change impacts and strengthen regional resilience.

HASSELL Principal and Head of Landscape Architecture Angus Bruce said that the international shortlisting of these projects highlights the high-level design thinking that our teams apply to all of their work.

“There were some fantastic landscape architecture projects this year globally, and to have three projects shortlisted within different categories is a great testament to the global HASSELL team who have worked so hard to deliver truly exceptional outcomes,” Angus said.

More information on the awards can be found here.

Three HASSELL projects have been shortlisted in World Landscape Architecture’s 2019 WLA Awards. [KO1] Two projects have made the Large Built category including Darling Harbour Public Realm and Stadium Park and Chevron Parkland, with Resilient South City making the Conceptual category.

 

[KO2] 

The remaking of Darling Harbour, one of Australia’s most visited public places and a critical location of central Sydney, has changed the heart of the city. The revitalised public realm better connects the city, improving walkability; and with 30% more public space, offers engaging new places for the enjoyment of locals and visitors alike.

 

The 41-hectare Stadium Park in Perth, Western Australia, provides an engaging waterside environment for the city’s new world-class sports and entertainment venue. Within the rehabilitated precinct, Chevron Parkland is designed to ignite the imagination, connect kids with indigenous culture and instil a love of nature. [KO3] 

 

As part of the Resilient by Design Bay Area Challenge, a brief was put forward to design inventive, community-based solutions to sea-level rise, severe storms, flooding and earthquakes.. Through extensive research and community engagement, the HASSELL+ proposal for South San Francisco mapped out ways to restore public access to the water and establish more parks and open green spaces to better manage climate change impacts and strengthen regional resilience.

 

HASSELL Principal and Head of Landscape Architecture Angus Bruce said that the  international shortlisting of these projects highlights the high-level design thinking  that our teams apply to all of their work.

 

“There were some fantastic landscape architecture projects this year globally, and to have three projects shortlisted within different categories is a great testament to the global HASSELL team who have worked so hard to deliver truly exceptional outcomes,” Angus said.

 

More information on the awards can be found here.

 [KO1]I think it should be the actual name of the program:
https://worldlandscapearchitect.com/2019-wla-awards/#.XK2-35gzbD4

 [KO2]Understand that we don’t want to repeat … again, but I think it’s tangling up the agreed names for each project. Darling Harbour Transformation is the urban renewal project. The precinct is home to ICC. The public realm is the landscape and open spaces.
Perhaps para below works?

 [KO3]Indigenous interpretation is key

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Wednesday 10 April 2019
Richard Mullane discusses rising sea levels at National Planning Conference

As part of the American Planning Association 2019 National Planning Conference this month in San Francisco, HASSELL Principal Richard Mullane will join other industry leaders to discuss how waterfront cities can adapt to become resilient in the face of rising sea levels and other climate concerns.

The session, titled ‘Sea Level Rise Planning Beyond 1.5C’, will focus on gaining an understanding around the complexities of sea level rises and how planners are taking action on the resilience and sustainability measures including coastal zone management, zoning, and design implementation.

The line-up of speakers include HASSELL Principal Richard Mullane, Michael L. Marrella from the New York City Department of City Planning, Ashley Muse from Google, Sarah Dougherty and Roland Lewis from Waterfront Alliance, and Jessica Fain from the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission.

HASSELL Principal Richard Mullane said this important discussion should not only involve the industry, but also the perspective and experiences from a wider audience.

“Sea level rise, and climate change in general, has the potential to be catastrophic for waterfront communities. As designers, it is important to listen to the entire community in order to gain a well-rounded understanding of what a resilient city looks like,” Richard said.

The ‘Sea Level Rise Planning Beyond 1.5C’ session will be held on April 15 between 8:30am – 9:45am (PDT), click here for more information.

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Tuesday 9 April 2019
HASSELL+ announced as finalist in 2019 World Changing Ideas Awards

The finalists for Fast Company’s 2019 World Changing Ideas Awards have been announced, with “Collect and Connect: Resilient South City” by HASSELL selected as a finalist within the ‘Spaces, Places, and Cities’ category.

World Changing Ideas is one of Fast Company’s major annual awards programs and is focused on social good, seeking to elevate brave concepts that harness the potential to make the world better. As part of the Resilient by Design Bay Area Challenge, the HASSELL entry is designed to improve South San Francisco’s resilience to sea level rise and climate change with a unique and innovative approach that will create more public green space and reduce the impacts of flooding, mitigate sea-level rise vulnerability, and restore native flora and fauna.

HASSELL Principal Richard Mullane says that addressing climate change no longer means just attempting to stop the globe from warming, and that it's imperative to consider design innovations for positive social impact and climate adaptation.

“Across the world, communities have to build resilience and adapt to climate change, and the design community can make in important contribution. The World Changing Ideas Awards gives designers the opportunity to showcase these important endeavours, and we’re honoured to be amongst the esteemed innovators on this list,” Richard said.

For a full list of the finalists and winners of Fast Company’s 2019 World Changing Ideas Awards, click here.

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